The Radically Awesome Adventures of the Animal Princess, Pranas T. Naujokaitis

The Radically Awesome Adventures of the Animal Princess

Animal Princess would rather muck about in the sewers fighting slime monsters than wear another frilly princess dress. In fact, she frequently does, ditching the usual royal trappings for animal-themed pajamas that grant her the abilities of the creatures she emulates.

With her trusty feline steed, Buttercup, at her side, Animal Princess dispatches nefarious thee-head wizards, frosting-spewing sentient cupcakes, and spectral dust bunnies alike with moxie and an almost fiendish aplomb. You won’t find any shoehorned moral lessons here; The Radically Awesome Adventures of the Animal Princess is pure bombastic mischief.

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Broken Age, Double Fine

Broken Age (Act I)

Double Fine’s Broken Age is only half the game it set out to be, but that’s OK. One of Kickstarter’s biggest crowdfunding triumphs, the point-and-click adventure surpassed its $400,000 goal less than 12 hours into its campaign in February 2012. It would go on to rake in $3.3 million, a sum so princely that the game could only grow in scope to match.

A victim of its own ambition—studio boss and LucasArts alum Tim Schafer blamed himself for designing “too much game”—Double Fine ran out of money mid-development. But instead of begging its backers for more, the company settled on an unorthodox solution: selling the first half of Broken Age to fund the second, to be delivered as a free update at a later time.

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Hildafolk, Luke Pearson

Hildafolk

It’s apparent from the outset that Hilda isn’t your typical blue-haired little girl. For one thing, she lives with her mother in the mountains, on the edge of a forest populated by magical creatures. In Hilda’s world, boys are made out of wood, antlered foxes gambol alongside itinerant water spirits, and furry beasts flock across the skies.

Hildafolk is an amuse-bouche of a tale. One of London publisher Nobrow’s 17×23 series, a format for emerging artists to “tell their stories in a manageable and economic format,” the book offers a glimpse into a world that’s tantalizingly, almost vexingly, brief.

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DC Super Friends: Flower Power, Courtney Carbone

DC Super Friends: Flower Power

Wonder Woman may currently be filling Batman’s knee-highs in the digital revival of Sensation Comics, but it’s not the Amazon’s first rodeo in Gotham City. In Flower Power, one of Golden Books’ DC Super Friends line of early readers, the princess of Themyscira finds herself at Gotham Botanical Gardens, where she tag-teams with Batgirl to investigate the arrival of a glowing green meteorite.

Turns out our dynamic duo aren’t the only ones who are after the space rock. Poison Ivy, sensing the meteorite’s spooky “plant powers,” wants to use it to the planet into her own private terrarium. Before long, Wonder Woman and Batgirl are caught in the tentacled embrace of a rabid Venus flytrap.

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